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When the war started, many Dakota who opposed the fighting gathered together and formed a separate camp on the Upper Sioux (Yellow Medicine) Reservation. The leaders of this "Peace Party" attempted both to stop the war and to secure the release of prisoners captured by Dakota soldiers. When the war ended many within the Peace Party, as well as some Dakota soldiers, surrendered to Col. Sibley and the U.S. military at "Camp Release" (near present-day Montevideo). After 303 Dakota men were convicted for their participation in the war, Col. Sibley removed the remaining Dakota non-combatants (approximately 1,600 people, mostly women, children, and the elderly) to Fort Snelling where they spent the winter in a cramped internment camp for civilians. Between 130 and 300 people died from illness within the camp, and the following spring they were forcibly relocated to the Crow Creek reservation in Dakota Territory.

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Secondary

Anderson, Gary Clayton, Woolworth, Alan R. Through Dakota Eyes: Narrative Accounts of the Minnesota Indian War of 1862. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Historical Society Press, 1988.